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Manspreading still a top etiquette rule violation on subway, study shows

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manspreading

A Hunter College study, released Thursday, found that 26 percent of seated men manspread on subways despite an MTA campaign designed to end the breach of subway etiquette.

NEW YORK — Manspreading is still a serious problem on the subway nearly two years after the MTA launched its subway etiquette ad campaign, a new study shows.

The Hunter College study, released Thursday, found that 26 percent of seated men manspread on subways. They are also likely to sprawl out in the seats even when train cars are packed. Men in their thirties are the most likely to manspread; 30 percent of those observed by students sat with their legs splayed out. Men in their forties were also big offenders; 29 percent of seated men in this age range were observed manspreading.

Commuters also frequently wore their backpacks even while standing, according to the study. Teens were the biggest offenders, likely because they are on their way to or from school. About 70 percent of 13-19-year-old teens studied had a backpack on while standing.

Hunter College students observed about 5,100 subway passengers over a month long period. The commuters were studied on 21 different subway lines at all times of the day and on different days of the week.

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